How to Make Your Wedding Flowers Mean Something: The Secret Language of Florigraphy

Are you looking for a new way to perk up your wedding flowers, or elevate them from a simple accessory to a statement piece that you carry down the aisle? A quick history lesson can help!

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(Photo: The Knot)

The tradition of wedding flowers and arrangements has been around since ancient times. Originally, brides carried aromatic bunches of dill, garlic, and other herbs and spices to ward off evil spirits. In ancient Greece and Rome, flowers were worn as garlands or head pieces to symbolize new life, hope, and fertility. It wasn’t until later that flowers were substituted for the strong smelling herbs, and often edible flowers were used.

Even though meanings have been attributed to flowers for thousands of years,  ‘floriography’ really became popular in Victorian England and the United States around the 19th century alongside a growing interest in botany. Floriography is a means of secret communication through the use or arrangement of flowers, used to send coded messages that couldn’t be expressed out loud.

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(Photo: Shall We Bloom)

The carefully selected flowers would be tied together into small bouquets called “nosegays” or “tussie-mussies”, to be gifted to their paramours. They could then be carried, or worn as a fashion accessory. Long lists of the flowers and their attached meanings were published in floral ‘dictionaries’, the most popular of which was The Language of Flowers by Kate Greenaway. First published in 1884, the book is still being reprinted today.

What would be more romantic than hiding a secret message to your husband in your bouquet?! Here are 20 of our favorite suggestions to include to tell the love of your life what they mean to you.

AppleBlossomEdit

CedarEdit

DaffodilEdit

IvyGeraniumEdit

LemonBlossomEdit

LungwortEdit

MilkVetchEdit

NarcissusEdit

PansyEdit

PetuniaEdit

PhloxEditt

PrimroseEdit

RanunculusEdit

RedCamelliaEdit

SweetWilliamEdit

TeaRoseEdit

ViscariaEdit

WhiteLilyEdit

WhiteVioletEdit

YellowTulipEdit

Until Next Time,

Rachelle

(Resources: Victorian Bazaar, Wikipedia, )

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